Area 51: A Preview on the Review

Cover of Annie Jacobsen's Airea 51: an Uncensored History of America's Top Secret Military BaseI literally just finished Area 51: An Uncensored History about an hour ago, and plan on having a review up tomorrow – well, later today, as it is the wee hours as I write this – Friday at the latest.

But I felt compelled to put down some initial thoughts, as there is a lot of buzz about this book, buzz driven by a relatively small part: the claim that the Roswell UFO crash of 1947 was actually part of a Soviet Russian “black operation.” This claim is actually only one small part of Area 51: An Uncensored History, discussed at the very beginning and very end of the book. But since the Fresh Air interview with author Annie Jacobsen last week, I’ve seen posts on Boing Boing and Io9, among many other sites, about the book and the one thing everybody focuses on is the book’s claims about Roswell and its ties to black ops.

Jacobsen, a journalist, says that the craft recovered at Roswell was actually a craft of Russian build based on designs by Nazi aircraft designers Walter and Reimar Horten. The Horten brothers – this part is a matter of historical record, by the way – were experimenting with stealth technology and unorthodox jet aircraft designs at the end of World War II. She further states that the bodies of aliens that witnesses claimed to have seen at the crash site were actually disfigured human children, the result of medical procedures or research either performed by or at least based on the work of Josef Mengele on behalf of the Russians.

The goal of this Soviet black op was twofold, according to Jacobsen. First off, the whole thing was designed as part of a psychological warfare effort designed to instill panic in an American civilian populace already jittery about UFOs, communism, nukes and the Cold War, Jacobsen’s source tells her. The military benefit of this was that if the United State’s air defenses and early warning systems were overwhelmed with reports of UFOs, real or imagined, it would provide a window – or cover – for an actual Soviet attack.

Why cover this up? Because American military leaders and scientists wanted not only to reverse engineer the advanced technology found in this craft – something more advanced than jet propulsion. They also wanted to pursue human experiments of their own, ostensibly to reproduce people with a similar alien appearance as the unfortunate Russian child pilots, for our own American black ops.

Sounds pretty far fetched, doesn’t it? Almost as much as the idea that a real extraterrestrial spacecraft crashed in Roswell.

The Horten Ho 229 powered prototype nearing completion in the Gothaer Waggonfabrik aircraft factory, 1944.I will say this: Jacobsen offers up a lot of tangential and circumstantial evidence to back up her claim; she actually makes, if not a compelling case, certainly enough of one to give the reader pause for thought. Furthermore, she separates out this dubious claim from the rest of Area 51: An Uncensored History, which is actually exhaustively researched and documented – some 20 percent of the book is taken up by footnoted source citations. Another big chunk, some 10 percent of the total text, is taken up with acknowledgments, most of which are concerned with the people she interviewed for the book, on the record – many of whom were actually directly involved with the programs at Area 51 in the 1950s through the 1970s, and discuss their work publicly for the first time.

There is a lot of information here that has only recently been declassified and Jacobsen connects the dots and fills in the gaps – some of which would yawn quite large, otherwise. Even students of history will find much that is new to them (I certainly did). In cases where information on former need-to-know black ops have been declassified for some years – or even well known historical events, such as the Cuban missile crisis – Jacobsen has still managed to uncover previously unknown facts and bring them to light.

All of this makes me think that perhaps it was a shame to include the claim about Roswell, as interesting as it may be, regardless of its veracity. There are a lot of revelations here about Area 51, the history of U.S. nuclear testing and the development of overhead surveillance for espionage purposes. This book would be of interest to everyone who has an interest in not just military history, but politics and U.S. history in general.

I’ll save the rest for my review. Let it suffice to say that there is lot more worthy information in Area 51: An Uncensored History, than the fantastic Roswell claim; to judge it solely on this doesn’t do it justice.

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